(Source: arcaneimages, via hyperwave)

sagansense:

“The neural changes that we found associated with physical sensation and movement systems suggest that reading a novel can transport you into the body of the protagonist,” says Gregory Berns. "We already knew that good stories can put you in someone else’s shoes in a figurative sense. Now we’re seeing that something may also be happening biologically.” - Does reading actually change the brain? | Futurity

sagansense:

“The neural changes that we found associated with physical sensation and movement systems suggest that reading a novel can transport you into the body of the protagonist,” says Gregory Berns. "We already knew that good stories can put you in someone else’s shoes in a figurative sense. Now we’re seeing that something may also be happening biologically.”
- Does reading actually change the brain? | Futurity

(Source: wildcat2030, via hyperwave)

(Source: itsjaymeejaymee)

"You simply cannot invent any conspiracy theory so ridiculous and obviously satirical that some people somewhere don’t already believe it."

— Robert Anton Wilson, Everything Is Under Control: Conspiracies, Cults, and Cover-Ups (1998)

(Source: hyperwave)

bobbycampbell:

Cagliostro The Great from Robert Anton Wilson‘s Schrödinger’s Cat Trilogy

nihilarmstrong:

CAPITALISM

(Source: studioghifli)

(Source: cipherface)

hailianer:

The top image reads wan siluvas zeldam, or “The Legend of Zelda”.

UPDATE: Currently it should read wan siluvas zeldæ to be accurate, but I have yet to update the image.

This is the orthography for Archaic Hylian I’ve devised using the canon cipher/script from Skyward Sword.  My Archaic Hylian is mostly contemporaneous with the events of Skyward Sword, so I had to apply the canonical script to my conlang.

Inexplicably, the script that Nintendo made has only 20 glyphs, so I had to get creative to fit AH’s 29 phonemes onto only 20 characters.  The non-Hylian characters are all IPA; phonemes for all except long vowels, which are not phonemic.

The table on the left shows the bare alphabet.  The pairs of phonemes /i/ and /j/ as well as /u/ and /w/ are each represented by a single glyph, which only rarely causes ambiguity in writing since hiatus is rare in AH.

The table on the right shows how the remaining sounds of Archaic Hylian are written: doubled letters add voice to consonants and doubled length to vowels, while the four diphthongs are written, top to bottom, <ai>, <æo>, <ei>, and <oi>.

Words are written with spaces between them.

*The starred letters are those whose value in the canonical English-based cipher are significantly different from the value I’ve assigned them for my purposes.  At only 5/20, I consider that a success.  In order, their canonical values are <j, b, v, d, g>.

>Back to Archaic Hylian grammar directory.

(via cipherface)